tweak: growing up on summary

Not that I doubt Nic Sheff is or was a drug addict; I guess it just seems like he's trying too hard to become one of his heroes. A cliched story of an addict who really is too concerned with his California land of plastic existence. He recounts his spiral through addiction and his very lowest points, to his turn toward rehab and the twelve steps and back time and again. As we watch Nic plunge into the mental and physical depths of drug addiction, he paints a picture for us of a person at odds with his past, with his family, with his substances, and with himself. There are intense sex scenes in the book, as well as a series of disturbing characters (including an addict whose girlfriend nearly killed him by shooting him in the head, and a drug client who Nic catches in the middle of a bondage sex act). You think he gets it together in the end, as he claims, but that's just so he can build you up to buy his second lousy memoir about relapsing, appropriately titled We All Fall Down. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. February 19th 2008 Plus, there was almost nothing about meth. Both books were compelling and it was amazing to read about the same story from the son's perspective after reading about the experience from his father's perspective - a rare experience. I'm betting the only reason his writing ever got published when he was in school was because his father is a journalist with friends in high places. I am curious if this book was only published thanks to Nic's father's connections. Common Sense and other associated names and logos are trademarks of Common Sense Media, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization (FEIN: 41-2024986). I love how Nic's father was so open with his son. Nic steals from his family, including his younger brother, lies, and even decides at one point to become a drug dealer. Truthfully, I understood this before I read this book, so my hope was that Nic's story would have something else, something more insightful, to teach me. Sheff wants so badly to be the next dark, dangerous, and doomed druggy genius, but he's going to have clean up more than his act if he ever wants to belong in the same company as Burroughs, Bukowski, Miller, et al. View All Titles. And they will find themselves quickly feeling sorry for and frustrated with an increasingly desperate Nic. I had just finished Beautiful Boy, which is written by this author's father regarding and is about his son's (the author of Tweak, Nic's) battle with drug addiction prior to picking up Tweak. This one just irritated the hell out of me and made me badly wish I could punch the guy in the face. Okay, I get it: drugs are bad and people who use drugs make bad decisions. Nic has courage. Sheff wants so badly to be the next dark, dangerous, and doomed druggy genius, but he's going to have clean up more than his act if he ever wants to belong in the same company as Burroughs, Bukowski, Miller, et al. Not this insipid drivel. Ultimately, the book ends up reading like a cliche that we've read and seen and heard too many times to make it fresh anymore. Tweak: Growing Up on Methamphetamines by Nic Sheff Written with a first-person on-the-scene journalistic style that allows its author/protagonist an eerie degree of detachment, Nic Sheff's TWEAK is the dark counterpoint to BEAUTIFUL BOY, written by his father, David Sheff. Squandering his parent's money and efforts, he was nothing but selfish time again and time again. Instead of working towards positive changes and a better life, he thought it was more productive to constantly name drop and obsess over some old washed out rock stars famous ex girlfriend. Your privacy is important to us. Free eBook offer available to NEW US subscribers only. That's the story I want to read. I'm still waiting to read his father's book, "Beautiful Boy," but I wonder what, if anything, that will lend to this story. It did not. Sheff spends a lot of time boasting about how great a writer he is, which is strange because this book reads like an immature 14 year old wrote it. This book blew me away! Do you think they impact kids' choices? I definitely prefer the father's book over the son's, not to say that the son's memoir isn't powerful, it just isn't enjoyable to read. “And though I have done many shameful things, I am not ashamed of who I am. © Common Sense Media. Nic is honest about the toll drugs are having on his body -- also, he talks about his girlfriend's heroin overdose and saving her life with CPR. Welcome back. In the end, teens will be touched by Nic's honesty -- and they will be exhausted. I remember him writing about how him and his father used to go on walks together and his father would snuggle him up in his long trenchcoat...they obviously had a very close relationship. I love memoirs about addiction, they are fascinating and usually serve as a nice reality check whenever my often troubled mind veers into darker territories. It is so poorly, terribly and arrogantly written that it makes me seethe with anger. Ultimately, the book ends up reading like a cliche that we've read and seen and heard too many times to make it fresh anymore. Nic's account is messier than his dad's version in. And although the book is "true," there are some facts in the book that don't add up and add an air of questionability to the whole story (for example, sometimes the dates don't add up; another example is when Sheff states that his friend Yakuzo lives in a house in Brentwood - then a few pages later, she suddenly lives in a high-rise condo building elsewhere). It's obvious that he has so much potential, but instead keeps choosing a life filled with drugs, dealing, occasional homelessness, creepy people, medical problems and more. We’d love your help. fuck this kid & his problems (tho it never became clear precisely what those were, only that they caused him to become a fucked up junkie). It's a harrowing portrait—but not one without hope. Ask your kids: What other examples can you think of? Sheff spends a lot of time boasting about how great a writer he is, which is strange because this book reads like an immature 14 year old wrote i. i never noticed how annoying a tendency that is until reading this book. Readers will find all the biggies here. In fact, it doesn't start until he's in his early 20's and the worst of his drug use sounds like it was in college. It's just really scary. Wondering if Tweak: Growing Up on Methamphetamines is OK for your kids? Suggest an update to this review. Nic has courage. The book also said very little about his growing up. I am sure the movie starring so g. Honestly after reading Beautiful Boy this book was a let down. He looked up to his father a great deal. I truly enjoyed this book. It's obvious that he has so much potential, but instead keeps choosing a life filled with drugs, dealing, occasional homelessness, creepy people, medical problems and more. This is ultimately a story about a young man "learning to stand on his own," but there is very little else that marks it for the young adult market. In fact, it doesn't start until he's in his early 20's and the worst of his drug use sounds like it was in college. Other Resources. I had just finished Beautiful Boy, which is written by this author's father regarding and is about his son's (the author of Tweak, Nic's) battle with drug addiction prior to picking up Tweak. tweak is a biography about nic sheff and his struggles with drug addiction. This guy's writing was published in Newsweek? He uses flashbacks throughout the book, recalling both to his unorthodox childhood and to the ups and downs of his life as an addict. RESOURCES. Our ratings are based on child development best practices. And although the book is "true," there are. Like Ellen Hopkins' popular Crank, this book demonstrates how addiction, especially addiction to meth amphetamine, is thoroughly destructive, not just to the user but to the family as well.

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